This blog is not currently active – URLs and details for my active blogs

For my active blogs, please see:

http://sustainingknowledgecommons.org

Sustaining the Knowledge Commons (2014-) is a team research blog dedicated to a SSHRC-funded Insight Development Grant project focused on the economics of transition to open access (e.g. open access article processing charges, resource requirements for small scholar-led journals).

http://poeticeconomics.blogspot.com

The Imaginary Journal of Poetic Economics (2004-) is a long-standing individual scholarly blog. Examples of series include The Dramatic Growth of Open Access and Creative Commons and Open Access Critique Series. My current focus (as of May 2015) is current issues in copyright and licensing for open access.

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Black Out Speak Out June 4

Black Out Speak Out – for nature and democracy in Canada – June 4th. Coordinated by a number of environmental groups. Spread the word! http://www.blackoutspeakout.ca/

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The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement – latest secret copyright agreement

Public Knowledge has a great post on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement – the latest trade agreement currently being negotiated in secret by governments and corporations – basically the same group who brought us SOPA and ACTA.

 

 

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The cost of cuts to Access to Information

Kady O’Malley on the impact of the $500,000 cuts to the Infomation Commissioner’s Office: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/inside-politics-blog/2012/04/access-to-info-watch-information-commissioner-facing-500-k-in-not-so-voluntary-budget-cuts.html

Excerpts:

Responding via email to a query on what the cuts will mean for her office, Legault told cbc.ca that the office will “need to reassess its operations once more, and noted that it may also heighten the risk of judicial review applications based on too-long investigations, which could ultimately result in higher cost to the taxpayer.

She also worries that “system-wide budget cuts” could have a “significant impact on Access to Information” throughout government, citing comments from her predecessor, John Grace, who observed that “as the public service experiences more and deeper budget cuts, the danger is that officials, already cool to the access law, can cloak themselves in self-righteousness.”

One final note: The commissioner is currently in the midst of a comprehensive review of alleged interference with access to information requests by political staffers…

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Grace-Pépin Access to Information Award

The Information Commissioner of Canada has just announced the creation of the new Grace-Pépin Access to Information Award, Recognizing those who contribute to the promotion of access to information principles.

Is it just me or does this sound like what we librarians do? The deadline is May 1st.

In future years, announcement of the winner of the award will take place during National Right to Know Week.

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